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Orca Obsessed

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What exactly is SeaWorld’s thought process here? 
They stuck Orkid, Makani, and a heavily pregnant Kalia in the medical pool and lifted them completely out of the water. Orkid is thrashing around, and the male trainer is trying to forcefully rip that thing (whatever it is, not 100% sure) out of Kalia’s mouth. 
Why would they make Kalia lay out of the water like that when she’s getting close to the end of her pregnancy? Regardless of how long she was physically out of the water, it is not a wise move to do that to a whale who is so young and so pregnant.

What exactly is SeaWorld’s thought process here?
They stuck Orkid, Makani, and a heavily pregnant Kalia in the medical pool and lifted them completely out of the water. Orkid is thrashing around, and the male trainer is trying to forcefully rip that thing (whatever it is, not 100% sure) out of Kalia’s mouth.
Why would they make Kalia lay out of the water like that when she’s getting close to the end of her pregnancy? Regardless of how long she was physically out of the water, it is not a wise move to do that to a whale who is so young and so pregnant.

😂😂😂

😂😂😂

Another photo of the orca hunt in Greenland. A hunter tows an injured/deceased orca behind his boat by it’s flukes.

Another photo of the orca hunt in Greenland. A hunter tows an injured/deceased orca behind his boat by it’s flukes.

Orcas are being driven and killed in Greenland.
Such behavior is absolutely beyond me.

Orcas are being driven and killed in Greenland.
Such behavior is absolutely beyond me.

How do you all feel about another senior trainer stepping down?

How do you all feel about another senior trainer stepping down?

When Hyak II lived at the Vancouver Aquarium, Dr. John Ford observed him often and even showed him picture books. Hyak II’s (est. 1967-1991) sole interest in viewing photos of his own kind over photos of other species manifests orca intelligence and self-awareness. Killer whales have excellent vision and can even see in color!

Video: “Killer or Gentle Giant - Vancouver Aquarium” uploaded by 4theOrcas on YouTube

Antarctic orcas 💙
Photo: Bruce Fryxell

Antarctic orcas 💙
Photo: Bruce Fryxell

"SeaWorld was created as strictly entertainment. We didn’t try to wear this false facade of educational significance."
— George Millay, Founder of SeaWorld, on Seaworld’s 25th anniversary, 1989

"SeaWorld was created as strictly entertainment. We didn’t try to wear this false facade of educational significance."
— George Millay, Founder of SeaWorld, on Seaworld’s 25th anniversary, 1989

Last week, Nalani turned 8 years old at SeaWorld Orlando. She was born to Katina and Taku on September 18, 2006. However, her story is quite abnormal… Nalani is SeaWorld’s first inbred killer whale; Katina and Taku mated, even though they were mother and son.

9 days after little Nalani was born, her 4-year-old brother/uncle, Ikaika, tried to mate with her. Her father/brother, Taku, was also aggressive with her. For some reason, Katina did not try to prevent these things from happening, as she seemed to favor her sons over her new daughter. In an attempt to resolve this issue, SeaWorld put nursing Katina, Ikaika, and Taku on benzodiazepines (drugs). Then Taku was shipped from Orlando to SeaWorld San Antonio and Ikaika (aged 4) was banished to Marineland Canada on a breeding loan.

The following year, Taku died prematurely at age 14 from West Nile Virus, which he contracted from a mosquito bite due to logging at the surface—something that would never occur naturally in the wild. After a legal battle between SeaWorld and Marineland, Ikaika was exported back to the U.S. in 2011, but instead of being reunited with his mom and siblings in Orlando, he was sent to San Diego, where he is currently held.

Katina and her 3-year-old son, Makaio, have recently been recorded mating. Additionally, little Makaio and his now 8-year-old inbred sister, Nalani, have also been witnessed mating. What will the future hold for this family?
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Photo & Post: @seaslaverysucks

Last week, Nalani turned 8 years old at SeaWorld Orlando. She was born to Katina and Taku on September 18, 2006. However, her story is quite abnormal… Nalani is SeaWorld’s first inbred killer whale; Katina and Taku mated, even though they were mother and son.

9 days after little Nalani was born, her 4-year-old brother/uncle, Ikaika, tried to mate with her. Her father/brother, Taku, was also aggressive with her. For some reason, Katina did not try to prevent these things from happening, as she seemed to favor her sons over her new daughter. In an attempt to resolve this issue, SeaWorld put nursing Katina, Ikaika, and Taku on benzodiazepines (drugs). Then Taku was shipped from Orlando to SeaWorld San Antonio and Ikaika (aged 4) was banished to Marineland Canada on a breeding loan.

The following year, Taku died prematurely at age 14 from West Nile Virus, which he contracted from a mosquito bite due to logging at the surface—something that would never occur naturally in the wild. After a legal battle between SeaWorld and Marineland, Ikaika was exported back to the U.S. in 2011, but instead of being reunited with his mom and siblings in Orlando, he was sent to San Diego, where he is currently held.

Katina and her 3-year-old son, Makaio, have recently been recorded mating. Additionally, little Makaio and his now 8-year-old inbred sister, Nalani, have also been witnessed mating. What will the future hold for this family?

Photo & Post: @seaslaverysucks

While SeaWorld continues to dig its heels in – pointing out that tens of thousands of visitors are in its parks right now – others are responding more progressively. In 2012 the National Aquarium in Baltimore, cancelled its performances. Since then visitors have been able to sit and watch the dolphins as they are simply taken care of by staff. Now, the aquarium is considering retiring their eight bottlenose dolphins altogether and is in talks to create the first ocean-side dolphin sanctuary in the US. Its decision was based on regular polling of visitors; it learned that people no longer felt comfortable with the show.

Others are following suit. This September, the Clearwater Aquarium in Florida announced it would also end animal shows, choosing to focus on rehabilitation and marine resources instead. When asked by the Guardian if SeaWorld would ever consider a similar move, the company said the terms “retire” and “sanctuary” are misplaced in the context of animal care. But added: “The short answer is no.”
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However, even if there isn’t a future for such attractions in the west, many conservationists are concerned that the problem could move elsewhere.
“In other parts of the world, like China, the industry is growing exponentially. In the last 10 years we’ve seen around 50 aquaria opening up in China that have captive belugas, bottlenose dolphins and now they’re looking at orcas as well. So, while we’re making progress in one part of the world, things are not going so well in other places.”
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In SW’s August second-quarter report, CEO Jim Atchison announced “significant progress in our plans to expand our theme parks outside the US”, and indicating that the company has signed a letter of intent to co-develop parks in Asia, India and Russia.
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Source: “Marine park attractions: can they survive?” by The Guardian
Via @seaslaverysucks

While SeaWorld continues to dig its heels in – pointing out that tens of thousands of visitors are in its parks right now – others are responding more progressively. In 2012 the National Aquarium in Baltimore, cancelled its performances. Since then visitors have been able to sit and watch the dolphins as they are simply taken care of by staff. Now, the aquarium is considering retiring their eight bottlenose dolphins altogether and is in talks to create the first ocean-side dolphin sanctuary in the US. Its decision was based on regular polling of visitors; it learned that people no longer felt comfortable with the show.

Others are following suit. This September, the Clearwater Aquarium in Florida announced it would also end animal shows, choosing to focus on rehabilitation and marine resources instead. When asked by the Guardian if SeaWorld would ever consider a similar move, the company said the terms “retire” and “sanctuary” are misplaced in the context of animal care. But added: “The short answer is no.”
.
However, even if there isn’t a future for such attractions in the west, many conservationists are concerned that the problem could move elsewhere.
“In other parts of the world, like China, the industry is growing exponentially. In the last 10 years we’ve seen around 50 aquaria opening up in China that have captive belugas, bottlenose dolphins and now they’re looking at orcas as well. So, while we’re making progress in one part of the world, things are not going so well in other places.”
.
In SW’s August second-quarter report, CEO Jim Atchison announced “significant progress in our plans to expand our theme parks outside the US”, and indicating that the company has signed a letter of intent to co-develop parks in Asia, India and Russia.

Source: “Marine park attractions: can they survive?” by The Guardian
Via @seaslaverysucks